Bio

(c) Elodie Grethen

(c) Elodie Grethen

Emily Stewart, born in London in 1985, is a Vienna based violinist.

At the age of 5, soon after her family had moved to Costa Rica, she started learning the piano and the violin.

Classically trained, Stewart’s heart was always set on jazz and improvised music. In 2008, after taking a hiatus from music to study Translation, she met Andreas Schreiber with whom she studied Jazz Violin at the Anton Bruckner Private University in Linz. In 2014 she began playing the viola as well, an instrument she has taken to with ease. Stewart enjoys experimenting with a wide range of styles, and has had the pleasure of working with a variety of musicians and groups across the musical spectrum. Her flexibility as a musician and her understanding of different genres have made her a sought after string player, especially in cross-over projects, as a studio musician, as well as in theatre and interdisciplinary productions.

In her own work, Stewart finds ways to interweave literature and the performing arts, and has used the works of Elias Canetti, Emily Dickinson, William Carlos Williams, Robert Frost, and most recently Robert Burton and her own writing as frameworks for compositions and performative pieces.

 

Emily Stewart was awarded the START-Stipendium for Music and Performing Arts 2017 from the Austrian Federal Chancellery.

.

Recent collaborations include:

Wiener Burgtheater, Soap&Skin, Bohatsch und Skrepek, Gary Husband, Jan Lundgren, Asja Valcic, Koehne Quartet, Wolfgang Puschnig, Violetta Parisini, Golnar Shahyar and Mahan Mirarab, Derrick Ryan Claude Mitchell's "Saint Genet", Rambo Rambo Rambo, Felix Kramer, Kvin - Philipp Kienberger Quintett, ZINQ, Neuschnee, Iris Electrum, Clemens Wenger, Studio Dan Strings, Jazzwerkstatt Wien, Velvet Elevator Orchestra, die Strottern, Ramona Kasheer, Rosa Sánchez Cuarteto, Dschungel Wien, Hannes Löschel, Peter Havlicek und Neue Wiener Konzertschrammel, Lukas Kranzelbinder, Franui und Nico and the Navigators, Punches and Judies...

(c) WhyT.org

(c) WhyT.org